Jageshwar Dham

Jageshwar Dham

Jageshwar is located at an altitude of 1870 meters. Jageshwar is the 8th Jyotirling among the Twelve and has great religious value.

Jageshwar Shiv temple is one of the oldest shiva temple in India.

Jageshwar is a Hindu pilgrimage town in Almora District, dedicated to Lord Shiva, located 36 km northeast of Almora and around 101 Kms away from Nainital in Kumaon Region of Uttarakhand Uttranchal.

The temple city of Jageshwar comprises a cluster of 124 large and small stone temples, dating 9th to 13th century AD, with many preserved by the Archaeological Survey of India (ASI), which include Dandeshwar Temple, Chandi-ka-Temple, Jageshwar Temple, Kuber Temple, Mritunjaya Temple, Nanda Devi or Nau Durga, Nava-grah Temple, a Pyramidal shrine, and Surya Temple amongst which the oldest shrine is the ‘Mrityunjaya Temple’ and the biggest shrine is the ‘Dandeshwar Temple’. Once the centre of Lakulish Shaivism, in the Jataganga river valley near a Deodar forest (Cedrus deodara) starting from Artola village on Almora–Pithoragarh highway, where two streams Nandini and Surabhi flow down the hills in the narrow valley and meet near the sacred spot.

The townfolk believe that Jageshwar is the place of Nagesh among the forest of Deodar, 8th among the Dwadasa Jyotirlingas: the twelve resplendent lingas of Lord Shiva established by Lord Vishnu.

The ‘ Jageshwar Monsoon Festival ‘, held between 15 July to 15 August takes place at Jageshwar during the Hindu calendar month of Shravan, and the annual ‘Maha Shivratri Mela’ (Shivratri festival), which takes place during spring has an important place in the calendar of the entire Kumaon region.

Places to visit in Jageshwar

Mahamrityunjaya Temple, Jageshwar Overview Shiva is believed to be the savior and redeemer of all his devotees, even delivering them from death, or as in Hindu mythology, the ruler of the underworld, Yamraj, who collects the souls of the deceased from the terrestrial realm

Mahamrityunjay, is made from three words. Maha, meaning great, mrityun, meaning death, and jaya, meaning victory. Hence the word itself literally translates to the great victory over death. This temple hence, has a great many number of devotees, visiting the lingam (the stone idol representing he God), perched between the opening of an eye. The temple is ever reverberating with the chants of Mahamrityunjay Mantra, and the deity is believed to grant all wishes when worshipped with true devotion. The idol itself, is one of a kind carving, with no similar representation anywhere in the country.

Jageshwar Mahadev Temple, Jageshwar Overview This temple is by far the most visited temple in the whole complex, dedicated to the incarnation of Shiva in the form of a child. The story goes as Shiva being an attractive alpha male to all the women folk of the village, where he used to meditate. To not offend the men of the village, Shiva incarnated himself as a child. The temple itself is divided into two parts, with one dedicated to Shiva, and the other to his consort, Goddess Parvati. The entrance is flanked by the idols of the keepers of the sanctum sanctorum, Nandi and Skandi, complete with all the armaments, adding to the majestic bearing of the temple as well. Well worth a visit.

Jageshwar Mahadev Temple, Jageshwar Overview This temple is by far the most visited temple in the whole complex, dedicated to the incarnation of Shiva in the form of a child. The story goes as Shiva being an attractive alpha male to all the women folk of the village, where he used to meditate.

To not offend the men of the village, Shiva incarnated himself as a child. The temple itself is divided into two parts, with one dedicated to Shiva, and the other to his consort, Goddess Parvati. The entrance is flanked by the idols of the keepers of the sanctum sanctorum, Nandi and Skandi, complete with all the armaments, adding to the majestic bearing of the temple as well. Well worth a visit.

Dandeshwar Temple, Jageshwar Overview

An epitome of Nagar style architecture, the Dandeshwar Temple is as tall as you can crane your neck, quite literally. It is believed to house the shrine of Lord Shiva as the staff bearer, hence the name Dandeshwar, or the bearer of the 'dand', the staff.

The idol of the deity is in the form of a large uncut natural rock, following the prevalent custom of worshipping the Gods in their unaltered natural form. An architectural delight that makes up as an increasingly interesting tale to share with others.